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Be Earthquake Ready

Are you ready for an earthquake?

Are you ready for an earthquake?

When is anyone really ready for an earthquake? But you never know when it will quake. The follow list are helpful tips and preparation in the case of earthquake. I know it is a little long but you can never be over prepared.

EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS                                              

by Robert Munden

  • Secure your hot water heater
  • Secure household items and furniture
  • Check chimneys, roofs and wall foundations for stability. Note: If your home was built before 1935, make sure your house is bolted to its foundation. If your home is on a raised foundation, make sure the cripple walls have been made into shear walls. Call a licensed contractor if you have any questions.
  • Keep breakable and heavy objects on lower shelves. Put latches on cabinet doors to keep them closed during shaking.
  • Fasten shelves securely to walls.
  • Place large or heavy objects on lower shelves.
  • Store breakable items such as bottled foods, glass, and china in low, closed cabinets with latches.
  • Hang heavy items such as pictures and mirrors away from beds, couches, and anywhere people sit.
  • Brace overhead light fixtures.
  • Repair defective wiring and leaky gas connections which are potential fire risks.
  • Repair any deep cracks in ceilings or foundations. Get expert advice if there are signs of structural defects.
  • Install an Automatic Gas Shut Off
  • PLAN TO BE SAFE DURING AN EARTHQUAKE
  • Practice “drop, cover, and hold on” to be safe during an earthquake.
  • Identify safe spots in every room, such as under sturdy desks and tables.
  • Learn how to protect yourself no matter where you are when a disaster strikes.
  • PLAN TO RESPOND AFTER AN EARTHQUAKE
  • Keep shoes and a working flashlight next to each bed.
  • Teach everyone in your household to use emergency whistles and/or to knock 3 times repeatedly if trapped. Rescuers searching collapsed buildings will be listening for sounds.
  • Identify the needs of household members and neighbors with special requirements or situations, such as use of a wheelchair, walking aids, special diets, or medication.
  • Take a Red Cross first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training course. Learn who in your neighborhood is trained in first aid and CPR.
  • Know the location of utility shutoffs and keep needed tools nearby. Know how to turn off the gas, water, and electricity to your home. Only turn off the gas if you smell or hear leaking gas.
  • Get training from your local fire department in how to properly use a fire extinguisher.
  • Install smoke alarms and test them monthly. Change the battery once a year, or when the alarm emits a “chirping” sound (low-battery signal).
  • Check with your city or county to see if there is a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program in your area. If not, ask how to start one.
  • Make sure that you have ample supplier and that nothing has expired
  • PLAN TO COMMUNICATE AND RECOVER AFTER A DISASTER
  • Locate a safe place outside of your home to meet your family or housemates after the disaster.
  • Designate an out-of-state contact person who can be called by everyone in the household to relay information.
  • Provide all family members with a paper list of important contact phone numbers.
  • Determine where you might live if your home cannot be occupied after an earthquake or other disaster (ask friends or relatives).
  • Know about the emergency plan developed by your children’s school or day care. Keep your children’s school emergency release card current.
  • Keep copies of essential documents, such as identification, insurance policies and financial records, in a secure, waterproof container, along with your disaster supplies kits. Include a household inventory (a list and photos or video of your belongings).
  • Have occasional “earthquake drills” to practice your plan. Ask your babysitters, house sitters, neighbors, coworkers, and others about their disaster plans, and share your plan and with them.
  • Stay as safe as possible during an earthquake. Be aware that some earthquakes are actually foreshocks and a larger earthquake might occur. Minimize your movements to a few steps to a nearby safe place and stay indoors until the shaking has stopped and you are sure exiting is safe.
  • When you feel an earthquake, duck under a desk or sturdy table. Stay away from windows, bookcases, file cabinets, heavy mirrors, hanging plants, and other heavy objects that could fall. Watch out for falling plaster and ceiling tiles. Stay undercover until the shaking stops and hold onto your cover. If it moves, move with it.
  • DROP to the ground; take COVER by getting under a sturdy table or other piece of furniture; and HOLD ON until the shaking stops. If there isn’t’t a table or desk near you, cover your face and head with your arms and crouch in an inside corner of the building.
  • Stay away from glass, windows, outside doors and walls, and anything that could fall, such as lighting fixtures or furniture.
  • If in bed when the earthquake strikes, hold on and protect your head with a pillow, unless you are under a heavy light fixture that could fall. In that case, move to the nearest safe place.
  • Use a doorway for shelter only if it is in close proximity to you and if you know it is a strongly supported, load-bearing doorway.
  • Stay inside until shaking stops and it is safe to go outside. Research has shown that most injuries occur when people inside buildings attempt to move to a different location inside the building or try to leave.
  • Be aware that the electricity may go out or the sprinkler systems or fire alarms may turn on. DO NOT use the elevators.
  • If you are in a HIGH-RISE BUILDING, and not near a desk or table, move against an interior wall and protect your head with your arms. Stay indoors. Glass windows can dislodge during the quake and sail for hundreds of feet.
  • If you’re in a CROWDED STORE OR OTHER PUBLIC PLACE, do not rush for exits. Move away from display shelves containing objects that could fall.
  • If you’re in a WHEELCHAIR, stay in it. Move to cover, if possible, lock your wheels, and protect your head with your arms.
  • If you’re in the KITCHEN, move away from the refrigerator, stove, and overhead cupboards. (Take time NOW to anchor appliances, and install security latches on cupboard doors to reduce hazards.)
  • If you’re in a STADIUM OR THEATER, stay in your seat and protect your head with your arms. Do not try to leave until the shaking is over then leave in a calm, orderly manner. Avoid rushing toward exits.

WHEN OUTDOORS

  • Stay there. If you’re OUTDOORS, move to a clear area away from trees, signs, buildings, electrical wires and poles. Move away from buildings, streetlights, and utility wires.
  • Once in the open, stay there until the shaking stops. The greatest danger exists directly outside buildings, at exits, and alongside exterior walls. Many of the 120 fatalities from the 1933 Long Beach earthquake occurred when people ran outside of buildings only to be killed by falling debris from collapsing walls. Ground movement during an earthquake is seldom the direct cause of death or injury. Most earthquake-related casualties result from collapsing walls, flying glass, and falling objects.
  • If you’re on a SIDEWALK NEAR BUILDINGS, duck into a doorway to protect yourself from falling bricks, glass, plaster, and other debris.
  • If you’re DRIVING, pull over to the side of the road and stop. Avoid overpasses, power lines, and other hazards. Stay inside the vehicle until the shaking is over. Stop as quickly as safety permits and stay in the vehicle. Avoid stopping near or under buildings, trees, overpasses, and utility wires. Proceed cautiously once the earthquake has stopped. Avoid roads, bridges, or ramps that might have been damaged by the earthquake.

Grease Fires

Grease FireGrease fires happen when a collection of grease or oil on a stove, oven, or fryer come in contact with a lit flame or become hot enough to ignite. Grease fires are extremely dangerous because it is a liquid and can spread rapidly and is easily splashed. This can cause the fire to spread to cabinets, furniture, and other flammable areas of the kitchen.

 The best way to deal with a grease fire is to prevent it. The number one way to stop a grease fire is to stay by the stove or fryer at all times. The most serious fires have occurred when food is left to cook on its own. Some other helpful hints are:

 Heat oil slowly. If your cooking oil gets heated too fast it can easily become flammable and spread through your kitchen or cooking area.

 Keep things away from the oil that is being heated. Be careful not to have any liquids close to the pan. If water spills into a hot pan filled with grease it will immediately turn into steam. The steam will spew the hot grease into every direction. As the hot grease lands onto other items (dish towel, counter tops….) the fire can quickly become out of control.

 Deep Fryers can be dangerous. If you are using a deep fryer use extra caution when is come to cords that can be pulled or tangled by people and especially children walking around the area. Also make sure the fryer is not close to the edge of the counter where there is a greater risk that it can get tipped over.

 Don’t overfill your pot. To avoid over filling your fryer first put some cold oil into the pot, lower the food you wish to fry and then add more oil as needed. Once the oil is heated add foods carefully. Pat down food with a paper towel to make sure that the food isn’t holding any water. Lower the food gently with tongs, a long fork, or recommended frying devices. Never drop food into the fryer because they can cause the oil to splatter.

 Be prepared. Keep the lid to the pot nearby and make sure it fits properly. Watch out for glass lids, they can break from exposure to the extreme heat of an open flame. Once the lid is secure the flames will go out by themselves due to the lack of oxygen. Only after the lid is secure you should then turn off the flame. Don’t remove the lid until the pot is completely cooled, this can take up to 30 minutes. If the grease is still extremely hot it can reignite and splatter.  Also have oven mitts or thick pot holders nearby to prevent your hands from being burned.

 Smothering the flame. If you don’t have a lid handy a grease fire can be smothered with baking soda. Flour is not recommended to smother a grease fire because flour is potentially combustible. Using a wet towel can cause the pan to tip over and cause the fire to spread. You also have the risk of the towel itself catching on fire.

 If a fire starts in the oven, turn off the flame and keep the door closed. Make sure that the oven has cooled completely to prevent the chance of the fire reigniting. It is recommended to wait at least 1 hour because ovens tend to cool down slowly.

 Never pick up a pan that is on fire.  A pan that is engulfed in flames can spill and spread rapidly. Also you greatly increase the change of getting burned or catching your clothes on fire.

 Treat any burns only after the fire is out. You should have ointment that can treat minor burns handy, if your burns are severe go to the emergency room. If your clothes catch on fire remember STOP, DROP, AND ROLL.

 Call 911. You can always call and have the fire department go back to the station if you are able to put the fire out yourself.

 Have a fire extinguisher on hand. Both a Class B and a Class K are effective in putting out flammable liquids such as grease and oil, but remember that a fire extinguisher can potentially spread the flames of a grease fire as you try to put it out so be careful when you are using it.

Help Point Claim Services

Help Point Claim Services

Life has a funny way of creeping up on in unexpected ways, sometimes good and sometimes bad. As people living life is good to ready for the unexpected and at Bob Munden Insurance we help you do just that. Help Point Claim Service is to be there for you in a time crisis.

What if there was one number you could call, in the event that the unexpected occurs? One number, that gave you someone to turn to when you couldn’t think of anyone else that could make things better? What if there was one number that you can call at any time, especially following a crisis?

That’s HelpPoint® Claim Services. Most of us aren’t always calm and collected in a crisis situation. We know that and provide services to help you in your time of need. HelpPoint® Claim Services representatives have been specially trained to help you. From advising what to do in an accident, to providing the names and phone numbers of professionals that can help you out, they are ready to guide you in taking steps toward getting things back to normal.

We know that the unexpected doesn’t always occur between hours of business operation, which is why a representative is available to help you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Our HelpPoint® Claim Services is available in English at 1-800-435-7764, en Español 1-877-732-5266, and for the hearing impaired at 1-888-891-1660

We know that a fire, an accident, or a burglary can turn your world upside down. That’s why Farmers specially trained HelpPoint® Claim Services representatives guide you through the process of getting everything back to normal in the wake of shock that inevitably follows a crisis. With our HelpPoint® Claim Services, all you have to do is call 1-800-435-7764; en Español at 1-877-732-5266; or for hearing impaired 1-888-891-1660 and a representative will help you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Farmers gets you back where you belong. We’re here for you in your time of need.

Business Insurance

At Bob Munden Insurance Services we make your business our business

The following terms and descriptions are to help you understand why it is important your business should be protected. You never know what can go wrong and it is always good to be ready for anything. You can click on any term to get more information.

Business Auto

When you own a business, you have a unique set of operation and protection requirements all your own. Especially for business owners that own and operate vehicles, Business Auto insurance provides coverage for your unique needs.

Business-Life Insurance

What happens to your business if something happens to you? Make sure that your dream and your business live on by considering the options that a Business-Life insurance policy can offer.

Crime

You never expected it to happen to your business. Your employees seemed honest, but now you’re fighting a lawsuit because someone used a client’s credit card information. Crime coverage helps protect your business from acts of dishonesty.

General Liability

A customer was injured while visiting your business and now you’re stuck with a pretty expensive medical bill. General Liability covers contractual, personal and advertising injury, as well as liability protection.

Partnership Life Insurance

If you are in a partnership, you hope that it continues for as long as you own your business. However, should something happen to one of the partners, it’s important to have coverage to survive this loss. Partnership Life insurance can offer you the protection you need.

Property

You arrive to work early one morning, only to realize that your business property was vandalized during the night. Fortunately, you had customized Property insurance to cover such a loss. Your business is up and running again, and you hardly missed a beat.

Small Business Workers’ Compensation Insurance

Losses from injuries that happen on the job, regardless of who’s at fault, can cost employers a great deal of time and money. Worker’s Compensation for small businesses offers unique coverage for just such losses.

Sole Proprietorship Life Insurance

What if something happens to you and your business still has a lot of debt? Make sure that your estate is protected with Sole Proprietorship Life insurance.

Stockholder Life Insurance

Stockholder Life insurance can be used to create a pre-death, buy-sell agreement and to arrange the sale of stocks to remaining shareholders should something happen to one or more of the business owners.

Surety Bond Program

A Surety Bond Program creates a contract for the fulfillment of an obligation. It gives some businesses an opportunity to grow in a way in which they couldn’t have without the program.